It’s Time to Spring Clean Your Personal Care Items!

Spring is here, and while you’re probably contemplating a spring clean of your home, we’ve got a better suggestion for you. That’s right; it’s time to spring clean your cosmetics and personal care items. It’s so easy for them to build up in your bathroom and to keep using the same old products for months, and (dare we say it) years on end. But, it’s time for that to change!

An overview of shelf-life regulations

The FDA has regulations for the shelf-life of drugs but not cosmetics. While many personal care products are classed as cosmetics and are not regulated for shelf life, some may be classed as both drug and cosmetic products, like moisturizers with SPF labelling. Anything wholly or partly classed as a drug is regulated in terms of shelf life and expiry dates.

Now that we’ve got that straightened out, here are a couple of ways to identify the products you should remove from your bathroom:

1.     Some items may have expired or be well beyond good use

Despite not being regulated, cosmetics only last so long. This is dependent upon the preservatives they contain, the conditions in which they are stored, and the bacteria they are exposed to. While we’re on the topic of preservatives, remember that while natural products are much healthier for your skin, and don’t contain synthetic preservatives (which is why we love them!), they may not last as long as the preservative-packed commercial products.

Products for the eye-area tend to have a shorter shelf-life because of the exposure to bacteria and fungi each time they are used.

When you’re spring cleaning, check for expiry dates on products that have them, and for products that don’t check for the following as a sign that it’s time to go!

-        Is your mascara or liquid eyeliner dry, or is it more than 2-4 months old?

-        Have you owned any other cosmetics with eye applicators for more than 1-2 years?

-        Have liquid or soft products begun to dry out, harden or crack?

-        Do any of the products smell undesirable – this can be caused by excessive exposure to sunlight or air?

2.     Some products may no longer be a good fit

Sometimes we make spur of the moment decisions and impulse buy. It results in products accumulating in your bathroom cabinet after just one use, or maybe none at all! Perhaps the fake tanning items and full coverage foundations you bought last year aren’t a good fit for your new active lifestyle, and you’re more concerned with using a great moisturizer and sunscreen instead. That’s ok – it’s time to live in the moment!

3.     Some products just don’t live up to expectations

Sometimes we find a product didn’t perform as we’d hoped, but we put it aside because it seems wasteful just to throw it out. Or what about the mistake we’ve all made – choosing a daring shade of lipstick only to find we look garish in it. Unfortunately, disappointment happens, but all you can do is clear it out of your bathroom and move on.

What about makeup brushes?

You should also deep clean your makeup brushes as part of your spring clean. Not only makeup particles, but also oil, dirt, dead skin cells and bacteria can become trapped in the bristles. Here’s how to clean them:

1.     Rinse the residual makeup out of your brushes by running under lukewarm water, focusing on the bristles.

2.     Fill a shallow bowl with warm water and add a small squirt of gentle shampoo (baby shampoo works great!).

3.     Gently swirl the tip of your brush through the water and then swirl gently in your hand for a little lather.

4.     Rinse the brush under running water. If the water isn’t running clear, then repeat steps three and four until it does.

5.     Wipe clean with a lint-free cloth while reshaping the bristles.

6.     Lay flat on another lint-free cloth to dry.

If your personal care items are getting out of control, maybe it’s time you started buying smarter. Why not give our 2 in 1 facial scrub and mask a try? 2 incredible uses in just the 1 tidy package!

Happy spring cleaning!

 

Sources:

https://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/Labeling/ExpirationDating/default.htm

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/beauty/makeup/tips/a17714/expired-beauty-products/

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=724

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